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COMMON GESTURES Among Americans

COMMON GESTURES Among Americans

American Gesture of No

American Gesture of No

  1. Americans are a not touch oriented.
  2. In normal social situations, Americans generally stand about 30 inches apart from one another, which is also considered their personal “comfort zone.”
  3. At sporting events or the theatre, Americans usually slide into a crowded aisle while facing forward, away from the people.
Call Me Gesture

Call Me Gesture

 

Gesture

Meaning

Americans shake hands, and from an early age they are taught to do so with a firm, solid grip. When greeting one another.
American children are taught to look others directly in the eyes. When greeting and conversing. If not, means shyness or weakness.
Arm raised and the open hand “waggles” back and forth. Signaling “hello” or “good-bye.” Or trying to get someone’s attention.
Americans will often wave to another person and then turn to make hand scoop inward; or raise the index finger, palm toward one’s face, and make a “curling ” motion with that finger. To beckon or summon another person.
Palm facing out with the index and middle fingers displayed in the shape of a “V.” “Victory” or “peace.”
Thumb and forefinger form a circle with the other three fingers splayed upward; it is used frequently and enthusiastically. “O.K.” meaning “fine” or “yes.”
Thumb up with a close fist. Meaning support or approval, “O.K.” or “Good Going!” or “Good job!”
Fist raised with index finger and little finger extended. Texas rallying call “hook ’em horns.” Baseball meaning “two outs.”
Whistling Pretty woman, cheering at sporting events, applauding performances.
Nodding and shaking the head. Yes and No
Extend the forefinger and make a circular motion near the temple or ear.

Something or someone is “crazy.”

 

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